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Parler

Parler is a US-based social networking service launched in August 2018, regarded as an alternative to Twitter. It is marketed as an unbiased, free-speech social media platform focused on protecting users' rights.

Content



Parler is considered to be among a list of social network platforms, including Minds, MeWe, Gab and BitChute, created in response to alleged anti-conservative bias in mainstream networks such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook.

In accordance with its free speech policy, Parler adopts a laissez-faire approach to offensive speech, citing the FCC's definition of obscenity to define the threshold for acceptable conduct. It is thus permissive of content that would be deemed offensive on other platforms, such as anti-Islamic and anti-feminist commentaries. This has allowed it to become a haven for conservatives critical of bias and censorship on services such as Twitter and Facebook.

Though originally envisaged as a bipartisan platform, a review of the service in May 2019 described it as a Twitter alternative for Trump fans, with its trending topics "devoted mostly to a small universe of Trump-friendly discussions".

History

Parler (from the French word for "to speak") was founded by CEO John Matze in 2018. Its rollout in August 2018 was plagued by bugs that made it almost unusable initially.

From December 2018 through 2019, the service gained a surge in usership after prominent conservative personalities, among them Brad Parscale, Senator Mike Lee, and activist Candace Owens, signed up and publicized the network to their social media followers on other platforms. Parscale had met with Matze in early May 2019 prior to signing up. Other notable users include conservative personalities banned from Twitter or other networks, such as Anthony Cumia, Jacob Wohl, Laura Loomer, Milo Yiannopoulos, Paul Joseph Watson and Roger Stone.

According to Matze, as of May 2019, Parler had about 100,000 users. Parler's user base more than doubled in June 2019 after around 200,000 nationalists from Saudi Arabia signed up to the network after allegedly suffering mass censorship and suspensions of accounts on Twitter.