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1989 Copa América



The Copa América 1989 football tournament was hosted by Brazil, from 1 to 16 July. All ten CONMEBOL member nations participated.

Brazil won their fourth Copa América, and first since 1949, by beating Uruguay 1–0 in the final match at the Estádio do Maracanã. This achievement ended a 19-year streak without official titles for the Brazilians. The last one had been in the 1970 World Cup.

The top scorer was Brazilian Bebeto. He scored six times, including three in the final group stage.

Venues

Squads

For a complete list of all participating squads, see: 1989 Copa América squads

First round

The tournament was set up in two groups of five teams each. Each team played one match against each of the other teams within the same group. The top two teams in each group advanced to the final stage.

Two points were awarded for a win, one point for a draw, and no points for a loss.

  • Tie-breaker
  • If teams finish leveled on points, the following tie-breakers are used:
  • # greater goal difference in all group games;
  • # greater number of goals scored in all group games;
  • # winner of the head-to-head match between the teams in question;
  • # drawing of lots.

    Group A

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    Group B

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    Final round

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    Result

    Goal scorers

    With six goals, Bebeto was the top scorer in the tournament. In total, 55 goals were scored by 30 different players, with only one of them credited as own goal.6 goals
  • Bebeto

    4 goals
  • Rubén Sosa
  • Carlos Maldonado

    3 goals
  • Romário
  • Arnoldo Iguarán

    2 goals
  • Claudio Caniggia
  • Juvenal Olmos
  • Buenaventura Ferreira
  • Adolfino Cañete
  • Alfredo Mendoza
  • Gustavo Neffa
  • Jorge Hirano
  • Antonio Alzamendi
  • Enzo Francescoli
  • Santiago Ostolaza1 goal
  • Baltazar
  • Geovani
  • Fernando Astengo
  • Juan Carlos Letelier
  • Jaime Pizarro
  • Jaime Ramírez
  • Oscar Reyes
  • Antony de Ávila
  • René Higuita
  • Ney Avilés
  • Ermen Benítez
  • Franco Navarro
  • Juan Reynoso
  • Rubén Paz

    Own goal
  • José del Solar